Arabidopsis Research Roundup: July 18th

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Published on: July 18, 2017

This weeks Arabidopsis Research Roundup includes four studies from around the UK. Firstly is a systems-level study of the drought response that includes Alessandra Devoto from RHUL as a co-author. Secondly Anne Osbourn’s group at the JIC investigates sesterterpenoid biosynthesis across plant species. Thirdly Paul Jarvis from Oxford University adds to this groups portfolio of research on the mechanisms that control thylakoid import. Finally Patrick Gallois (University of Manchester) provides further insight into the regulation of programmed cell death.


Kim JM, To TK et al (2017) Acetate-mediated novel survival strategy against drought in plants Nature Plants http:/​/​dx.​doi.​org/10.1038/nplants.2017.97

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Alessandra Devoto (Royal Holloway) is a co-author of this study led by Jong-Myong Kim, Mototaki Seki (RIKEN, Yokohama) and Taiko Kim Ko (University of Toyko) that investigates the system-wide alterations that plants make in response to drought stress. They demonstrate that the histone deacetylase HDA6 is the primary regulator of an epigenetic switch that leads to a metabolic flux conversion from glycolysis into acetate synthesis. This in turn stimulates the jasmonate signaling pathway that causes increased drought tolerance. Importantly the authors show that this critical survival response is evolutionarily conserved through monocots and dicots.


Huang AC, Kautsar SA, Hong YJ, Medema MH, Bond AD, Tantillo DJ, Osbourn A (2017) Unearthing a sesterterpene biosynthetic repertoire in the Brassicaceae through genome mining reveals convergent evolution. PNAS http:/​/​dx.​doi.​org/10.1073/pnas.1705567114

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Anne Osbourn (JIC) leads this study in which her group works with collaborators from Cambridge, Wageningen and UC Davis to perform a cross-species genome-wide analysis of sesterterpenoid biosynthesis. They use a novel search algorithm to identify paired enzymatic components that comprise sesterterpene synthases (STS). These enzymes were transiently overexpressed in tobacco leaves, resulting in the formation of fungal-like sesterterpenes, suggestive of convergent evolution of plant and fungal STS. This study illuminates possible future strategies for the beneficial use of sesterterpenes through metabolic and protein engineering


Bédard J, Trösch R, Wu F, Ling Q, Flores-Pérez Ú, Töpel M, Nawaz F, Jarvis P (2017) New Suppressors of the Chloroplast Protein Import Mutant tic40 Reveal a Genetic Link between Protein Import and Thylakoid Biogenesis. Plant Cell. http:/​/​dx.​doi.​org/10.1105/tpc.16.00962 Open Access

Paul Jarvis (Oxford University) leads this global collaboration that focuses on the chloroplast protein import protein Tic40. A suppressor screen identified two novel regulators of Tic40, ALB4 and STIC2 that they postulate are involved in the thylakoid targeting of a subset of proteins and that their influence becomes more important in the absence of Tic40.


Cai YM, Yu J, Ge Y, Mironov A, Gallois P (2017) Two proteases with caspase-3-like activity, cathepsin B and proteasome, antagonistically control ER-stress-induced programmed cell death in Arabidopsis. New Phytol.

http:/​/​dx.​doi.​org/10.1111/nph.14676 Open Access

Patrick Gallois is the corresponding author on this study that originates at the University of Manchester. They attempt to establish a role for cathepsin B and proteasome subunit PBA1 in the control of programmed cell death (PCD) and whether their functions interest with those of caspase-3. They reveal a complex system of regulation where aspects of PCD are differentially impacted by each of these proteins. They propose the role of cathepsin B might occur late in PCD following tonoplast rupture.

Arabidopsis Research Roundup: March 24th

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Published on: March 24, 2016

Just three papers this week in the UK Arabidopsis Research Roundup. Firstly Professor Anna Amtmann provides an audio description of her groups characterisation of the binding partners of the Histone Deacetylase Complex1 protein. Secondly Dr Carine De Marcos Lousa leads a study that investigates a set of plant-specific proteins involved in the cellular secretory pathway. Finally Dr Paul Devlin is a contributor to a study that characterises the role of a nucleoporin protein in the shade avoidance response.

Perrella G, Carr C, Asensi-Fabado MA, Donald NA, Páldi K, Hannah MA, Amtmann A (2016) The Histone Deacetylase Complex (HDC) 1 protein of Arabidopsis thaliana has the capacity to interact with multiple proteins including histone 3-binding proteins and histone 1 variants. Plant Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.15.01760 Open Access

Anna Amtmann (Glasgow) leads this European collaboration that investigates the binding capability of the Histone Deacetylase Complex (HDC) 1 protein, which has been previously shown to regulate multiple growth phenotypes due to its interaction with histone deacetylases. HDC1 proteins are ubiquitously present throughout plant tissues yet their secondary structure offers little clue to their specific binding interactions. Therefore this attempt to dissect the interaction spectrum of HDC1 and discovered that the protein interacts with different histone3 (H3) binding proteins but not H3 itself. Interestingly HDC1 could also interact with different variants of the H1 histone linker protein. The authors show that the ancestral core of HDC1 had a narrower range of interactions indicating that over evolutionary time the protein had developed more promiscuous binding. However even the conserved portion of the protein is able to interact with H3-associated proteins and H1, indicating that HDC1 played an important role in the establishment of interactions between histones and modifying enzymes.

Professor Amtmann kindly provides a short audio description of this paper. Apologies for the variation in sound quality and volume!

de Marcos Lousa C, Soubeyrand E, Bolognese P, Wattelet-Boyer V, Bouyssou G, Marais C, Boutté Y, Filippini F, Moreau P (2016) Subcellular localization and trafficking of phytolongins (non-SNARE longins) in the plant secretory pathway J Exp Bot. http://dx.doi.org/0.1093/jxb/erw094 Open Access

Carine De Marcos Lousa (Leeds Beckett)  is the lead author in the UK-French-Italian study that investigates the activity of plant specific R-SNARE proteins, called longins. SNARE proteins are critical for the membrane fusion events that occur during intracellular transport. A new four-member family of longins called ‘phytolongins’ (Phyl) that lack a typical SNARE domain have recently been discovered. These ubiquituosly expressed proteins are distributed throughout the secretory pathway with different members localised at ER, Golgi apparatus or post-Golgi compartments. Furthermore the export of the Phyl1.1 protein from the ER is dependent on a Y48F49 motif as well as the activity of at least three accessory proteins. This manuscript is the first characterisation of Phyl subcellular localisation and adds to our knowledge of specific mechanisms involved in the plant secretory pathway.

Gallemí M, Galstyan A, Paulišić S, Then C, Ferrández-Ayela A, Lorenzo-Orts L, Roig-Villanova I, Wang X, Micol JL, Ponce MR, Devlin PF, Martínez-García JF (2016) DRACULA2, a dynamic nucleoporin with a role in the regulation of the shade avoidance syndrome in Arabidopsis. Development. http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.130211

This Spanish-led study includes Dr Paul Devlin (RHUL) and introduces a new gene that is involved in the shade-avoidance-response in Arabidopsis. The DRACULA2 gene is a homolog of the metazoan nucleoporin NUP98, which is a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The authors find that other members of the NPC are also involved in the control of hypocotyl elongation in response to proximity of other plants. This is likely due to nuclear transport-dependent processes. However the authors suggest that DRA2 also has a transport-independent role that is related to its physical association with the NPC. This demonstrates that nucleoporins play an important role in plant signaling, although assigning specificity to their activity remains difficult given their general role in nucleocytoplasmic transport.

Arabidopsis Research Roundup: March 18th

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Published on: March 18, 2016

This weeks Arabidopsis Research Roundup includes three papers from the Norwich Research Park on very different topics. Firstly the team of Richard Morris investigates the nature of mRNA sequences that are transported over long-distances. Secondly Kristen Bomblies introduces a set of genes involved in the evolution of weediness whilst finally Cyril Zipfel is involved in research that developed a novel assay for identification of defence signaling components. Elsewhere Paul Devlin’s group from RHUL characterises the interactions between components of a light signaling pathway whilst Alex Webb and co-workers use a novel assay to confirm the activity of plant nucleotide cyclases involved in calcium signaling.

Calderwood A, Kopriva S, Morris RJ (2016) Transcript abundance explains mRNA mobility data in Arabidopsis thaliana. Plant Cell http://dx.doi.org/10.1105/tpc.15.00956 Open Access

Richard Morris (JIC) is the lead author on this ‘Breakthrough Report’ that analyses previously generated data in order to ascertain whether populations of mRNAs that are transported long-distances in the phloem are selected by any mechanism. They showed that in general mobile transcripts can be explained by their abundance and half-life, leading to the conclusion that the majority of transported mRNAs are not selected on the basis of their primary sequence.

Baduel P, Arnold B, Weisman CM, Hunter B, Bomblies K (2016) HABITAT-ASSOCIATED LIFE HISTORY AND STRESS-TOLERANCE VARIATION IN ARABIDOPSIS ARENOSA Plant Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.15.01875 Open Access

Recent ECR Research Grant awardee Kristen Bomblies (JIC) leads this investigation into growth variation in Arabidopsis Arenosa. This obligate outbreeding relative of A.thaliana is normally not weedy but can transition to weediness in conditions of high disturbance. This study uses transcriptome sequencing, genome resequencing scans for selection, and stress tolerance assays to investigate a weedy population of A.arenosa that has been discovered growing along railway lines through central and Northern Europe. These plants show constitutive upregulation of genes involved in heat shock and freezing tolerance. Amongst the genes that were strongly selected in the weedy population was LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY), which is known to regulate many stress-regulated genes in A.thaliana and therefore might be a significant determinant in the evolution of weediness.

Saur IM, Kadota Y, Sklenar J, Holton NJ, Smakowska E, Belkhadir Y, Zipfel C, Rathjen JP (2016) NbCSPR underlies age-dependent immune responses to bacterial cold shock protein in Nicotiana benthamiana Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.15118471

This Australian-Austrian-UK collaboration includes work from the lab of Cyril Zipfel (TSL). The initial work in this study uses the Nicotiana benthamiana expression system to identify novel leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing pattern recognition receptors (PRR) that interact with the BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1) protein, which is important in recognition of bacterial pathogens. N.benthamiana plants were treated with the effector peptide csp22 and the resulting samples were immunopurified with BAK1. They identified a protein termed RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN REQUIRED FOR CSP22 RESPONSIVENESS (NbCSPR) which, when silenced in tobacco resulted in reduced defence responses to the csp22 peptide. Subsequent expression of NbCSPR in Arabidopsis caused antibacterial resistance. Primarily the authors demonstrate a novel protocol that could be used to identify further novel components in signaling pathways that response to pathogen attack.

Siddiqui H, Khan S, Rhodes BM, Devlin PF (2016) FHY3 and FAR1 Act Downstream of Light Stable Phytochromes Front Plant Sci. 7:175 http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2016.00175 Open Access
DevlinPic
Paul Devlin (RHUL) is the lead on this study that looks at the regulation of the ELF4 gene. This gene is a light-dependent target for the transcription factors FHY3 and FAR1 and the authors demonstrate that this signaling acts via not only the phytochrome PhyA but also through phyB, phyD, and phyE. ELF4 induction by FHY3 and FAR1 occurs specifically in the evening, which allows expression of ELF4 beyond dusk during shortening days. Without the action of the two transcription factors, this ELF4 expression is not maintained resulting in further downstream gene expression changes that alters the cycling of the circadian clock.

Abdul-Awal SM, Hotta CT, Dodd AN, Davey MP, Smith AG, Webb AA (2016) NO-mediated [Ca2+]cyt increases depend on ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity in Arabidopsis Plant Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.15.01965 Open Access

This study continues Alex Webb’s (Cambridge) work in the area of calcium signaling by investigating the control of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) production in Arabidopsis. Although the role of cADPR in plant signaling is well established there are no ADPR cyclase enzymes with strong similarity to known metazoan enzymes in previously interrogated plant genomes. This argues for either a unique synthesis route for cADPR or for the activity of an enzyme with low sequence similarity to previously characterized cyclases. To test these difference ideas the authors developed two novel fluorescence-based assays to measure ADPR cyclase activity. These assays reveal that indeed there is activity that resembles the characteristics of a cyclase, which additionally is activated by nitric oxide (NO). This potentially links NO signaling activity to increased levels of cADPR and mobilisation of a calcium signal.

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