Analysing phenotypes and measuring callose

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Published on: January 9, 2013
Part of Figure 7 from Green et al., showing the an example of Phenophyte output.

At the end of last year, you may have missed two useful publications from Plant Methods which use new free online tools to make your life easier.

Phenophyte can help you measure 2D areas quickly and accurately. It was described in November’s Plant Methods by Green et al., a team mainly from  Columbia, USA. Users chose if they want to analyse indivudial images, compare before/after images (as shown in the figure to the left), or analyse a timecourse. They then upload the images – the upload tool allows up to 2GB or 500 images, and sequential uploads are possible if required. The computational results can be previewed before submitting the job. When processing is complete, the user will be emailed a link to the results, which must be downloaded within a week. The manual provides detailed tips on how to take the photographs to upload, and the guidance is standard with the exception of the use of a colour/size checker (for example, this one), and the interface is straightforward and friendly.

Figure 5 from Zhou et al., showing the CalloseMeasurer interface and output.

A more specialized application is CalloseMeasurer, from the Robatzek group at The Sainsbury Laboratory. Zhou et al. describe a piece of software for quantifying callose deposition with enough accuracy to quantify the growth of filamentous pathogens within a plant by recognising the spreading network of callose deposition caused by the pathogen. The paper is heavy on technical detail, but guides readers through using CalloseMeasurer in the ‘Image Processing’ section of the paper. Users must have Acapella software installed, and they simply drag and drop the CalloseMeasurer script into the application window and start using the programme.



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